Subject – History key resources

There are specialist resources available for History to help you with research and assignments.  These range from subscription databases, open access research, freely available web resources and digital archives where out of copyright texts and documents can be found.

Subject databases allow you to search more specifically for research about your assignment topics.  You can find subject databases using the links below, or via Discover – use the Publications search or Providers A-Z to go directly to resources.

Art Full Text – coverage includes English-language journals, yearbooks, and museum bulletins an a range of Arts and Humanities topics.

British Newspapers 1600-1900 – digital collection of British historic newspapers. Also includes specially commissioned essays and contextual materials written by expert scholars to aid with perspective and analysis.

Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) over 180,000 titles published during the 18th century, including books, pamphlets, essays and broadsides.

John Johnson Collection – an archive providing access to thousands of items selected from the John Johnson Collection of Printed Ephemera, offering unique insights into the changing nature of everyday life in Britain in the eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

JSTOR – includes back issues of core journals in economics, history, politics and sociology, as well as in other key fields in the humanities. Note: material generally excludes the three previous years.

LexisLibrary – provides access to full text UK newspapers.

Find links to some of the most useful digital archives for the History topics studied at the University of Sunderland, plus advice on primary sources – where to find them, how to use them – on the Library History page.

Find links to lots more useful research, tools and information on History topics on the Library History page.

University Library Services provides access to a unique range of Special Collections, focusing on local history and mining in particular. This working archive is used in the day to day teaching, learning and research of the History department and is a major feature of some local history modules.